Stephen Gire

Stephen Gire is a research scientist in the Sabeti Lab, focusing on viral evolution and population dynamics for some of the world's most deadly viruses, as well as developing methods for identifying fevers of unknown origin. With a background in public health and virology, he can be seen trudging through the rainforest of Africa with a camera in one hand and a pipette in the other.

Before joining the Sabeti Lab, Stephen spent time at the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention researching vector-borne infectious diseases. He then moved on to complete a Masters of Public Health at Columbia University and a three-year fellowship with the United States Army Medical Research Institute of Infectious Diseases (USAMRIID). He has researched viruses such as West Nile, Dengue Fever, Monkeypox and Ebola, and he conducts on-site training in biological techniques to laboratory staff in the developing world.

When Stephen is not in the lab or in a small plane over the forests of Africa, he is actively feeding his obsession for photography, catering food for a small army, or generally being an overindulgent foodie- of which he takes much pride.

Click for Stephen's personal website.

Gire SK, Stremlau M, Andersen KG, Schaffner SF, Bjornson Z, Rubins K, Hensley L, McCormick JB, Lander ES, Garry RF, Happi C, Sabeti PC. Emerging Disease or Diagnosis?. Science. 2012 Nov 9;338(6108):750-2. PubMed PMID: 23139320.

Sealfon R, Gire S, Ellis C, Calderwood S, Qadri F, Hensley L, Kellis M, Ryan ET, LaRocque RC, Harris JB, Sabeti PC.
High depth, whole-genome sequencing of cholera isolates from Haiti and the Dominican Republic. BMC Genomics. 2012.

Wilhelm M, Kukekov NV, Schmit TL, Biagas KV, Sproul AA, Gire S, Maes ME, Xu Z, Greene LA. Sh3rf2/POSHER Protein Promotes Cell Survival by Ring-mediated Proteasomal Degradation of the c-Jun N-terminal Kinase Scaffold POSH (Plenty of SH3s) Protein. J Biol Chem. 2012 Jan 13;287(3):2247-56. Epub 2011 Nov 28. PubMed PMID: 22128169.

Sproul AA, Xu Z, Wilhelm M, Gire S, Greene LA. Cbl negatively regulates JNK activation and cell death. Cell Res. 2009 Aug;19(8):950-61. PubMed PMID: 19546888; PubMed Central PMCID: PMC2739106.

Wilhelm M, Xu Z, Kukekov NV, Gire S, Greene LA. Proapoptotic Nix activates the JNK pathway by interacting with POSH and mediates death in a Parkinson disease model. J Biol Chem. 2007 Jan 12;282(2):1288-95. Epub 2006 Nov 9. PubMed PMID: 17095503.